Spalted maple urn

I believe that God is the artist, and that I have been granted the amazing privilege of unveiling his work. This amazing coloring that I found inside a maple log illustrates that belief perfectly.

This will be the cremation urn for a friend, so there will be a lid for this (probably walnut).

9 inches tall, 7 inches diameter. Friction polish finish.

Prairie Skies II

This started out as a really ugly log. This is another one where I can’t decide which is my favorite side. I’m over the moon at the figure and coloring in this one.

The wood came from the North Dakota farmstead of my immigrant grandparents.

Boxelder. 5 inches diameter, 4 1/2 inches high. Teak oil, topped of with friction polish.

Not bad for firewood

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A local company salvages timber from buildings being torn down as well as urban trees being removed, and every once in a while they offer some of their “scrap” free for the taking as firewood. Being the frugal (a.k.a. cheap) guy I am, I brought home a load. One piece of poplar looked like it had potential so I chainsawed in in half to find some fun figuring. Here’s the result. 5 1/4″ high, 5″ diameter. Teak oil finish.

First hollow forms

I had the good fortune this weekend to attend a hands-on turning class led by Trent Bosch, a well-known turner and wood sculptor. Here are the fruits of that class: two hollow forms turned from green ash.

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They’re about 4 1/2 inches diameter and about 4 inches tall. #1 (on the left) has kind of an amphora shape (minus the handles) with a rounded bottom, so it rests on it’s side. The photo doesn’t show it well, but there’s a little curl figure in #2 on the right. (It’s just a smartphone picture that I snapped this morning after I finished sanding and applying some Danish oil.)

It’s going to be a while before I do some more of this sort of thing. Turning hollow forms requires some tools I don’t have yet. Unless there’s some angel out there who’d like to gift me with some?